Region of Origin

Commodity:

Avocado

Description & Origin

The avocado originated in South-Central Mexico and has been an essential part of human life there for as long as 10,000 years. There is evidence of its domestication by Mesoamerican peoples as early as 5,000 years ago. The avocado was extremely important in Aztec culture and was thought to provide strength, promote fertility, and act as an aphrodisiac. It spread naturally throughout the sub-tropic...

Other Names

Aguacate (Spanish), Palta (South American Spanish), Alligator Pear, Butter Fruit (India)

Health Benefits & Nutrition

Avocados are rich in protein, potassium (they contain even more than a banana!), fiber, and vitamins C, K and E. Avocados are among the best food source of healthy fatty acids. The primary fat in avocados is a monounsaturated fat called oleic acid (the same as in olive oil), which is associated with reduced risk of heart disease. Avocados are also very low in carbohydrates and sugar, making them the perfect part of a keto or paleo diet.

Our Varieties

Avocado Green Skin

AKA: Tropical Avocados, Dominican Avocados, Florida Avocados, SlimCado™

Description

Green skin avocados are West Indian or West Indian x Guatemalan-type hybrids. They are large in size and pear-shaped. The fruit’s skin is vibrant green throughout ripening – most cultivars shipped as “green skin" do not turn black when ripe (with some exceptions). They have smooth, but tough skin that clings to their golden-yellow flesh around a large inner pit. The fruit has a mild, grassy, lightly nutty flavor with a hint of sweetness. The texture is less buttery and more watery than a hass, but still somewhat creamy.

Variety Tips & Tricks

Green skin avocados are great for slicing and dicing – their firm flesh holds up on sandwiches or salads. They’re also lower in calories than a hass avocado due to their lower fat content.

Commercial Availability (Grown for the US Market)

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Dom. Rep.
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USA (FL)
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Avocado Hass

Description

Hass avocados are the most well-known Mexican type avocado – and the most popular avocado variety in the world due to their exceptional fat content. They have pebbly skin that ripens from green to a nearly black color (depending on the time of year!). The flesh is pale green closest to the skin, and creamy yellow towards the large inner pit. Hass avocado flesh is full of healthy fats and therefore very rich and creamy. The fruit’s flavor is nutty, rich, and slightly buttery.

Variety Tips & Tricks

Hass avocados are the best variety for guacamole – other varieties do not have enough fat (and have too much water) to achieve the proper texture.

Commercial Availability (Grown for the US Market)

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MEXICO
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Foodservice Tips

Traditional Culinary Uses

Avocados are primarily used to make dips and sauces, like the ubiquitous guacamole, or sliced and used as a topping on sandwiches, burgers, tacos, soups, and more. Avocados can also be stuffed or deep fried.

Flavor Pairings

Bacon, Seafood, Chorizo, Chicken, Egg, Black Beans, Tomatoes, White Onion, Lime, Lemon, Corn, Cilantro, Chile Pepper, Tomatillo, Summer Squash, Garlic, Sour Cream, Fresh Cheeses, Salt, Pepper

How to Store & Use in the Kitchen

Avocados are ripe when they yield to gentle pressure. Do not use color as the sole indicator, as some cultivars during certain seasons will not turn black during the ripening process! Avocados can be encouraged to ripen at 60ºF – 68ºF. Alternatively, store in a warm area of the refrigerator to extend shelf life.

 

Avocados should be carefully cut around the central pit and twisted open. The pit can be carefully pried out with a spoon or knife. The flesh can be scooped out or diced in the skin and inverted to pop the cubes out. Once cut, avocado will begin to oxidize unless fully coated with citric acid or completely wrapped in plastic wrap, so cut as close to plating as possible. Avocado does not freeze well.

Fight Food Waste Tips for root to stem cooking

Did you know that avocado pits can be used to create a natural dye for cloth? They yield a wonderful natural pink color!

Warehouse Storage & Handling

Maintain these conditions for optimal short-term storage shelf life.*

IDEAL STORAGE TEMP, UNRIPE:

45-50°F Unripe

IDEAL STORAGE TEMP, PRECONDITIONED:

38-42°F Preconditioned

RECOMMENDED TEMP STORAGE ZONE, UNRIPE:

40-54°F (Cool Storage)

RECOMMENDED TEMP STORAGE ZONE, PRECONDITIONED:

32-39°F (Cold Storage)

SUBJECT TO CHILLING INJURY:

Yes – temperatures below 41°F can cause chilling injury, including pitting, internal browning, and inability to ripen.

RELATIVE HUMIDITY:

85-95%

PRODUCES ETHYLENE, UNRIPE:

Yes-Low

PRODUCES ETHYLENE, RIPE:

Yes-Moderate

SENSITIVE TO ETHYLENE, UNRIPE:

Yes-High

SENSITIVE TO ETHYLENE, RIPE:

Yes-Medium

ETHYLENE RECOMMENDATIONS:

Do not store with any items that produce, or are sensitive to, ethylene gas to avoid issues with product quality.

RIPENS AFTER HARVEST:

Yes – avocados continue to ripen after harvest.

PROFESSIONAL RIPENING RECOMMENDED:

Yes – avocados (especially Hass variety) require professional post-harvest ripening to properly ripen, especially during certain times of year during which the fruit will not ripen at all without professional conditioning.

Quality Assessment

#1 avocados should be firm with minimal scarring and no internal defects such as browning or black spots. #2 avocados will show significant external scarring, but should have no internal defects.

Important Handling Notes

Avocados must be handled with care and checked on regularly, as there is no way to stop their ripening process. Ripeness should be measured by pressure, rather than color. Store avocados in a well-ventilated area away from ethylene sensitive products. Do not stack ripe fruit to avoid bruising. Do not store in cold storage as avocados are sensitive to chilling injury and will show internal damage if exposed to fluctuating temperatures.

Optimum Shelf Life

Depending on variety, conditions at harvest, and handling, avocados may last 1-3 weeks.

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