Region of Origin

Commodity:

Pineapple

Description & Origin

Pineapples are a tropical fruit that grows on a small shrub. Each plant produces only one pineapple. Pineapples are actually “multiple fruits” – meaning that each pineapple is composed of 100-200 individual fruits fused together in a helix formation. It can take up to two years for each pineapple to fully develop. The pineapple fruit is covered in a thick, leathery skin made up of “eyes” that are ...

Other Names

Piña (Spanish/Philippines), Abacaxi (Portuguese), Ananas (Europe), Sàb-pa-rót (Thailand), Nanas (Indonesia)

Health Benefits & Nutrition

Pineapples are a good source of vitamin C, manganese, and dietary fiber. The core of the fruit contains bromelain, a mixture of enzymes known for their anti-inflammatory properties, although medicinal levels of bromelain are generally derived from the pineapple stem, rather than fruit.

Our Varieties

Pineapple Gold

Description

Gold pineapples are the most common type of pineapple found around the world. The leathery skin of gold pineapples changes from green to golden yellow as they age. The juicy, fibrous, yellow flesh is exceptionally sweet with a distinct tropical tartness. The central core is woody and generally not consumed.

Variety Tips & Tricks

This is the classic all-purpose pineapple! The core of a gold pineapple can be carefully cut length-wise and used as a skewer. The hollowed-out skin can be turned on its side and used as a serving vessel.

Commercial Availability (Grown for the US Market)

Jan
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COSTA RICA
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
HONDURAS
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
MEXICO
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good

Pineapple Queen Victoria

AKA: Mini Pineapple, Baby Pineapple, Zululand Pineapple

Description

Queen Victoria pineapples are smaller than the average pineapple and stand about 4-5 inches tall (without crown) even when fully grown. The variety was first introduced in Mauritius, and it is widely grown there, as well as in neighboring Réunion and South Africa. The fruit’s skin is golden-brown and contains sweet, bright yellow flesh that is exceptionally sweet and refreshingly tart.

Variety Tips & Tricks

The Queen Victoria pineapple does not form a tough core like larger pineapple varieties, so the entire center of the fruit can be eaten. This petite fruit is perfect for hollowing out and using as a serving vessel for drinks or desserts.

Commercial Availability (Grown for the US Market)

Jan
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SOUTH AFRICA
Fair
Fair
Fair
Fair
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Fair
Fair
Fair

Foodservice Tips

Traditional Culinary Uses

The pineapple is exceptionally versatile and one of the world’s most iconic tropical flavors. It is most often eaten out of hand, added to fruit salads, used in juices and smoothies, or used as a royal garnish. Pineapple is central in a number of iconic recipes such as pineapple upside down cake and Easter ham – but it can also be used in innovative ways across menu-parts. Whole roasted for dessert and added to barbecue chicken skewers for dinner. It’s a must have for any tiki bar for piña coladas and tropical margaritas. Pineapple is also important in some SE Asian sweet and sour dishes, like Vietnamese fish soup (canh cà chua) or Chinese sweet and sour pork. The enzymes in pineapple juice may make it a useful meat tenderizing addition to marinades, although its effectiveness is not confirmed.

Flavor Pairings

Red Cabbage, Jalapeno, Habanero, Red Onion, Avocado, Bell Pepper, Baby Spinach, Coconut, Okra, Garlic, Ginger, Lime, Rosemary, Mint, Cilantro, Tamarind, Soy Sauce, Fish Sauce, Honey, Vanilla Ice Cream, Ham, Pork, Shrimp, Fish, Rum

How to Store & Use in the Kitchen

Pineapples should be stored at room temperature and used quickly. They don’t get sweeter after they are picked, but they will soften and change from green to yellow. Pineapples that are too tart were likely picked too early. Use pineapples when they are at the desired firmness.

 

The crown and skin (which is sometimes waxed) of the pineapple are not edible and should be removed. Cut the top and bottom off, cut off the skin as close to the sides as possible, and then remove the remaining brown eyes by making shallow diagonal cuts around the pineapple. The central core of large pineapples is too tough to eat and should also be cut away. Once cut, pineapple should be store in a sealed container in the refrigerator or frozen for later use.

Fight Food Waste Tips for root to stem cooking

Use pineapple skins and crowns as decorative elements. Baby pineapples have entirely edible flesh, so the core does not need to be cut away.

Warehouse Storage & Handling

Maintain these conditions for optimal short-term storage shelf life.*

IDEAL STORAGE TEMP:

45-55°F

RECOMMENDED TEMP STORAGE ZONE:

40-54°F (Cool Storage)

SUBJECT TO CHILLING INJURY:

Yes – pineapples exposed to temperatures below 45°F will show symptoms including internal browning, watery flesh, increased susceptibility to decay, and loss of crown leaves.

RELATIVE HUMIDITY:

85-90%

PRODUCES ETHYLENE:

Yes-Low

SENSITIVE TO ETHYLENE:

Yes-Low

ETHYLENE RECOMMENDATION:

Ethylene exposure may cause faster de-greening.

RIPENS AFTER HARVEST:

No

PROFESSIONAL RIPENING RECOMMENDED:

No

Quality Assessment

Pineapples should be firm, free from decay, and have uniform size and shape. The crowns should be green.

Important Handling Notes

While pineapples have a tough-looking exterior, they can bruise easily. Handle with care.

Optimum Shelf Life

Depending on variety, conditions at harvest, and handling, pineapples may last up to 4 weeks.

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